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Tarrant Tabor
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Specifications

        Primary Function:
        Crew:
        Engines:
        Power:
        Length:
        Wingspan:
        Weight Empty:
        Max. Weight:
        Machine guns:
        Ordnance:
        Cruise Speed:
        Max. Speed:
        Initial Climb:
        Ceiling:
        Range:
        First Flight:
bomber
six
Napier Lion W-12
6 x 450 hp. ea.
73' 2"
131' 3"
24,750 lbs.
44,670 lbs.
n/a
4,600 lbs.
96 mph
110 mph
600 fpm
13,200 feet
1,200 miles
5/26/1919






At the time it was built, the Tarrant Tabor was the world's largest aircraft. It was produced in Great Britain, initially as a heavy bomber that could reach targets deep within Germany.

World War I ended prior to the completion of the aircraft and it was decided to turn it into a commercial transport.

The design of the Tarrant Tabor originally called for two main wings.  The biplane design would be powered by four engines with two engines mounted between each wing in a push pull layout on both sides of the aircraft. When the aircraft was ready for flight, it was found that no four engines available would produce sufficient power for it. A third wing was added above the other two.  Two additional engines were mounted between the middle wing and the top wing. Those engines were placed in the conventional tractor configuration.

During the take off run of its first test flight, the Tarrant Tabor nosed over into the runway. It is believed that being nose and top heavy, plus the thrust from the two engines on the top wing, toppled the aircraft. No other Tarrant Tabor aircraft were built.

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